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12 Days of Christmas in July, Sewing + Quilting

Quick and Cozy Christmas Rag Quilt: 12 Days of Christmas in July

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WE’RE GETTING AHEAD OF THE HOLIDAY SEASON WITH OUR 12 DAYS OF CHRISTMAS IN JULY!  IT’S DAY 12, THE FINAL DAY OF THE SERIES,  AND TODAY’S PROJECT IS THE BIGGEST ONE SO FAR!  WE’RE MAKING A WONDERFULLY COZY CHRISTMAS RAG QUILT! 

When it comes time to cuddle up for a holiday movie marathon, nothing beats a cozy Christmas rag quilt.  So quick and easy to make, and even easier to customize, this rag quilt will be a family favourite for years to come!

Let’s take a look at how few steps there are in putting together one of these wonderful quilts.

 

 

Supplies for a Christmas Rag Quilt

Like many of my easy sewing projects, the supply list is not long for this Christmas rag quilt.  Here’s what you’ll need.

  • Fabric – assorted prints or solids for both the front and back of your squares.  I chose to use flannel, but you can use other fabrics.  Keep in mind that flannel and cotton will fray the best to give you the ragged-edge look we are going for.
  • Batting – choose the thickness that you prefer.  I used lightweight polyester batting for this rag quilt.
  • Ragged Quilt Snips – this tool is a must, in my opinion.  There are several brands on the market but look for a pair that has a spring-back action.
  • Rotary Cutter and Mat
  • Sewing Machine

 

Yes, that’s really all you need.

 

Check out my YouTube video here to see how easily this Christmas rag quilt came together.

 

 

To get the step-by-step instructions, continue reading below.

 

Instructions for Christmas Rag Quilt

The quilt that I made is comprised of 10-inch squares.  I used a total of 42 squares – six blocks wide by seven blocks long.  You, of course, can adjust this to any width or length you like, or you can adjust your square size. 

Start by cutting your fabric.  You will need 42 squares of whatever fabrics you have chosen for the front and 42 more for the back.  You will also need to cut 42 squares of batting.  If you are cutting 10-inch squares as I did, and you are also using a ½-inch seam allowance, cut your batting to 9 inches.  The goal is to have your batting small enough that it will not be caught in the seams as you sew your columns and rows together.

Next, you will build your blocks.  Place a square of backing fabric right side down.  Place a piece of batting on top of the backing, followed by a front piece which is right side up.  You will create a sandwich of sorts, and both sides should have the right side of the fabric facing out.

 

 

As you build your blocks, stitch across them diagonally to form an X to hold the batting in place.  You can use a straight stitch, a zig-zag stitch or a wavy stitch like the one that I used.  If you like, you can draw two diagonal lines to guide your stitching.

Once all your blocks are built, lay out the blocks to determine the pattern of your quilt.  Choose any style you like, but take note if you have any directional fabrics.  

Now it’s time to start stitching!  Be sure that as you sew your blocks together, you are stitching with back sides together.  You want the raw edges facing the front of the quilt.

I like to press my seams open as I go.  I prefer to have the seams open, as too many times, I have snipped too far down and put a hole in my quilt.  Working with the pressed seams provides a small buffer for the tip of your snips.

Be sure to stitch around the entire quilt with the same seam allowance as you have used for your blocks.  Alternatively, you could use a binding.  For my quilt, I simply stitched a ½-inch seam allowance around the perimeter of the quilt.

Once all the stitching is done, it’s time to cut.  You can snip the raw edges in any manner you like.  I find that using a slightly random pattern provides for a fuller ragged effect.  After you have finished snipping, toss your quilt into the wash and the dryer.  This will fluff up the edges and give you the cozy effect you are looking for.

And that’s it.  The most time-consuming part of this Christmas rag quilt is the snipping.  I simply put on a movie or two and get to work. 

These Christmas rag quilts are a favourite in our home, as I’m sure they will be in yours!

 

 

Not caught up on our 12 Days of Christmas in July?  Here’s what you may have missed:

 


 

Want to remember this?  Save this “Quick and Cozy Christmas Rag Quilt: 12 Days of Christmas in July” to your favourite Pinterest boards!

 

 

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Hi! I'm Tanya

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